One broken leg and a Taiwanese import – 20th LG Cup

The 20th LG Cup kicked off with the round of 32 on June 8, 2015 in Kangwon, Korea.

Fans eschew Won Seongjin 9 dan for Lee Sedol 9 dan and Lee Changho 9 dan at the 20th LG Cup gala.

Fans eschew Won Seongjin 9 dan for Lee Sedol 9 dan and Lee Changho 9 dan at the 20th LG Cup gala.

Fans mob the stars

As always, a lavish banquet proceeded official matches. Young fans didn’t waste any time acquiring autographs from their favorite Go celebrities.

Gu Li 9 dan makes a young fan's day with his autograph.

Gu Li 9 dan makes a young fan’s day with his autograph.

Choi Cheolhan’s woes

Perhaps some Nongshim noodles will make Choi Cheolhan feel better?

Perhaps some Nongshim noodles will make Choi Cheolhan feel better?

Poor Choi Cheolhan turned up in a wheelchair having recently injured his leg in a perhaps not so friendly football match.

He must have been in a lot of pain throughout his games as he is still waiting on the final surgery.

Round of 32

Not even a fractured ankle can stop Choi Cheolhan 9 dan take on Ke Jie 9 dan at the 20th LG Cup.

Not even a fractured ankle could stop Choi Cheolhan 9 dan from taking on Ke Jie 9 dan at the 20th LG Cup.

Korea dominated the first day of play, winning 10 out of the 16 matches.

However, the two big Lees, Lee Changho 9p and Lee Sedol 9p, were both eliminated.

The only Japanese professional to survive was Kansai Kiin’s Yo Seiki (Taiwanese name – Yu Zhengqi) 7p.

Interestingly, Yo first turned pro in Taiwan before deciding to pursue a career on the Japanese professional circuit.

Taiwanese professional, Lin Junyan 6p also made it through the first day, defeating sentimental favorite, Lee Changho 9p.

Much to Chinese fans’ dismay, after the first day, only 4 Chinese players remained still in play.

Lin Junyan 6 dan defeated Lee Changho 9 dan at the 20th LG Cup.

Lin Junyan 6 dan defeated Lee Changho 9 dan at the 20th LG Cup.

Round of 16

China’s luck vastly improved during the next round with Tuo Jiaxi 9p, Shi Yue 9p and Ke Jie 9p all entering the quarter finals. Kim Jiseok 9p got his revenge on Gu Li 9p after their 10th Chunlan Cup semifinal match.

Gu Li 9 dan and Kim Jiseok 9 dan repeat their Chunlan Cup Semifinal at the 20th LG Cup.

Gu Li 9 dan and Kim Jiseok 9 dan repeat their Chunlan Cup Semifinal at the 20th LG Cup.

Yo Seiki 7p continued to fly the flag strongly for the Kansai Kiin, defeating Korean youngster Lee Donghun 5p.

Korea will enter the quarter finals with some of its strongest pros.

Kang Dongyun 9p was too strong for the Korean amateur 5d An Jungki (who qualified through the preliminaries) and Wong Seongjin 9p snuffed out Taiwan’s hopes by defeating Lin Junyan 6p.

Over in the battle of the Parks, Park Younghun 9p emerged victorious over Park Junghwan 9p.

Round of 16 results

Yo Seiki 7 dan is into the quarter finals at the 20th LG Cup.

Yo Seiki 7 dan is into the quarter finals at the 20th LG Cup.

  • Ke Jie 9p defeated Choi Cheolhan 9p
  • Yo Seiki 7p defeated Lee Donghoon 5p
  • Kang Dongyun 9p defeated An Jungki 5d (amateur)
  • Tuo Jiaxi 9p defeated Kim Myeonghoon 2p
  • Kim Jiseok 9p defeated Gu Li 9p
  • Shi Yue 9p defeated Lee Jihyun 3p
  • Won Seongjin 9p defeated Lin Junyan 6p, and
  • Park Younghun 9p defeated Park Junghwan 9p.

Quarter final draw

Play will resume in November 2015 with the following pairings:

  • Park Younghun 9p vs Yo Seiki 7p
  • Won Seongjin 9p vs Tuo Jiaxi 9p
  • Kim Jiseok 9p vs Shi Yue 9p, and
  • Kang Dongyun 9p vs Ke Jie 9p.

LG Cup

The LG Cup is a major international Go tournament. It started in 1996 and the prize money is currently 300 million Won (approximately $270,000 USD at the time of writing). The runner up receives 100 million Won.

The main draw of 32 players is part invitational, comprising of 5 Korean players, 5 Chinese players, 4 Japanese players, 1 Taiwanese player and including the previous year’s winner and runner up.

The rest of the main draw is determined through a preliminary tournament. The format is single knockout, with the final played as a best of three games.

The tournament is sponsored by LG Electronics, a multinational consumer electronics company whose headquarters are in South Korea.

Game records

(with preliminary comments by An Younggil)

Tuo Jiaxi vs Lee Sedol

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The opening up to White 34 was well balanced.

White 44 and 46 were questionable, and Black was happy up to 49.

Black 85 was a mistake (he should play P10 first), and the game became even up to 102.

White 114 was a big mistake, and the White’s group was in trouble.

Black 141 was a good ko threat, and the game was practically over when Black eliminated the ko with 145.

Tuo played perfectly afterwards, and Lee couldn’t have any chances to catch up.

Gu Li vs Kim Jiseok

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Black 33 and 35 were good, and the result up to Black 47 was slightly better for Black.

White 68 and 70 were creative, and a ko started with 82.

White 108 and 110 were nice, but White 112 was questionable (O10 would be better).

Black saved all of his weak groups, and Black took the lead with 135.

Black 137 and 139 were nice, and Black solidified his lead up to 145.

Black 183 was too small, and White started to catch up.

Black 221 was the losing move, and White reversed the game up to 228.

Kim Myounghun vs Zhou Ruiyang

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The new pattern up to Black 33 created an even result.

Both White 54 and Black 55 were strong, and the result up to White 84 was still playable for both.

Black 93 was nice, and 105 was severe.

White 114, 116 and 122 were nice, but Black 127 and 129 were also strong, and the fighting was very complicated.

White 140 and 142 were small, and Black took a lead up to 151.

Black 157 and 159 were severe, and the game was decided when Black captured the right side with 181.

Choi Cheolhan vs Ke Jie

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White 12 is a very recently researched opening.

Black 23 was questionable, and White took the initiative with 24 and 28.

White 38 was sharp, and the result up to 50 was favorable for White.

White 58 and 60 were practical and White took sente with White 62 and 64, which was good.

White 78 and 80 were leaning attack, but Black 87 and 89 were nice counter.

Black 97, 101 and 117 were nice, and Black caught up.

White 122 to 126 were severe, but Black 137 was brilliant.

However, Black 141 was a big mistake, and White captured Black’s big group with 142 and 144.

 

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