Intrinsic Value of Weiqi

Q: Why do parents send their children to Weiqi lessons in spite of computer AI domineering humans in the game in this age?

A: There are a few points to answer this commonly asked question.

1. Life values learned in the game.

Example as in the Ten Commandments of Weiqi 围棋十决

As in the list, all items are applicable to real life. I will give each an example in a later article.

 

2. Cultural values learned in this game. Manners, greetings, patience and respect.

These traits are not taught by computers nor by our mainstream school teachers and professors.

Our school teachers had taught us to excel in our academics but in human to human relationships, this area has failed miserably. This could be the fundamental reason why social problems are occurring in our society.

 

3. The true values of winning and losing.

This may look abstract but I think it is still not difficult to understand.

For example, a person may win in an argument with his friend or spouse in a short term dispute, but he may lose this person’s friendship in the long term.

A very smart and intelligent guy may win arguments all the time, but he may not have a close friend at all as his way of debating may turn away many friends who find him domineering in conversation.

Learning Weiqi teaches us how to keep balance in the area of assessing winning and losing situation. In the first commandment of Weiqi, “Do not overly be greedy in winning”, teaches us to keep in check our attitude when comes to winning.

 

Overall in summary, the trend of computers winning human may seems to have an negative impact on the development of promoting the game now in the short term, but I believe the understanding of the intrinsic (or core nature) value of the game will outlast and turn the trend eventually.

 

Advertisements

Gu Li dominates round 2 of 17th Nongshim Cup

Gu Li dominates round 2 of the 17th Nongshim Cup.

The round 2 of the 17th Nongshim Cup was played from November 27 to December 1, 2015, in Busan, Korea.

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwan 9 dan at the 17th Nongshim Cup.

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwan 9 dan at the 17th Nongshim Cup.

Choi Cheolhan wins two games

Choi Cheolhan 9p, the 3rd player from team Korea, faced to Guangya 6p, who stopped Ichiriki Ryo’s winning streak at the end of round 1.

The game was relatively calm and well balanced up to the middle game.

However, Choi’s attack was gentle but powerful, and he captured White’s center group to finish the game.

Other pros were reviewing the game between Choi Chelohan 9 dan and Gu Li p dan.

Other pros were reviewing the game between Choi Chelohan 9 dan and Gu Li p dan.

Choi Cheolhan’s next opponent was team Japan’s 2nd player, Ida Atsushi 8p.

Ida (Black) played very well and he was leading through the middle game with his fighting spirit.

However, Black played several slack moves on the right side area, and White built a big territory at the bottom to reverse the game.

Gu Li wins three games

Gu Li 9p, the 3rd player from team China, didn’t let Choi Cheolhan to win three constructive games.

Gu Li 9 dan wins three games to play in the final round of the 17th Nongshim Cup.

Gu Li 9 dan wins three games to play in the final round of the 17th Nongshim Cup.

Gu (White) took the early lead just after the opening with his powerful cut, and he managed the game very smoothly afterwards.

Choi tried to complicate the game with tricky moves, but Gu’s defense was excellent.

Gu Li’s next opponent was team Japan’s 3rd player Kono Rin 9p.

Kono (Black) was leading the game with his active and thick moves and he maintained his lead in the beginning of the endgame.

However, he made a crucial mistake when Gu probed on the right side, and the game was suddenly reversed and decided.

Park Junghwan 9p was team Korea’s 4th player, who’s ranked #1 in Korea.

However, he didn’t stop Gu’s winning streak, and Gu became a hero for team China at the 17th Nongshim Cup, round 2.

Final round

The final round will be played in Shanghai, China, when play resumes on March 1, 2016.

Thanks to Gu Li’s wonderful performance during this round, China still has three players in reserve – Gu Li 9p, Lian Xiao 7p and Ke Jie 9p.

Meanwhile, Murakawa Daisuke 8p and Iyama Yuta 9p are ready to play for team Japan, but Lee Sedol is the last man standing for Korea.

The next game will be between Gu Li and Murakawa Daisuke, and I’m looking forward to watching the final round in March next year!

The Nongshim Cup

The Nongshim Cup is a team event between China, Japan and Korea.

The sponsor, Nongshim, is a Korean instant noodles company.

The tournament uses a win and continue format, which is common in these team events.

Korea has dominated this event, winning it 11 times. In contrast, Japan has won it only once, while China is slowly catching up with four wins.

The prize money for the Nongshim Cup was greatly increased in 2015.

The previous winner’s purse was 200 million Korean Won (about $173,000 USD at the time of writing), but starting with the 17th Nongshim Cup, the prize for the winning team is 500 million Korean Won (approximately $430,000 USD).

Game records

After the game between Wu Guangya 6 dan (lef) and Choi Cheolhan 9 dan with Gu Li 9 dan and Lian Xiao 7 dan.

After the game between Wu Guangya 6 dan (lef) and Choi Cheolhan 9 dan with Gu Li 9 dan and Lian Xiao 7 dan.

Choi Cheolhan vs Wu Guangya – Game 5

The opening up to White 26 was well balanced.

White’s sequence from 40 to 48 was exquisite, and the game became favorable for White up to 50.

White 68 should have extended at Black 69, and the game became complicated up to Black 81.

Black 91 was a good move, and White’s three stones were captured up to 95.

White 96 was sharp, but Black 97 and 99 formed a fierce attack.

White 104 was the losing move, and that should have been at 106.

Since Black 105 was sente for Black, there was no way for White to save his center group after Black 107.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/12\/Choi-Cheolhan-vs-Wu-Guangya-20151127.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Ida Atsushi 8 dan (left) and Choi Cheolhan 9 dan, just after the game was finished.

Ida Atsushi 8 dan (left) and Choi Cheolhan 9 dan, just after the game was finished.

Ida Atsushi vs Choi Cheolhan – Game 6

Black 33 to 39 were nice to develop over the center, and the opening was slightly better for Black.

Peeping at Black 51 was sharp, and the trade up to Black 65 was favorable for Black.

White 66 to Black 73 was beneficial exchanges for White, and White controlled the center with 74.

Black 75 to 79 were well timed invasion, and Black took the lead.

However, Black 95 and 97 were slack (should be cut at 99), and the game was reversed with White 96 to 100.

White 116 should have been at Black 117. Black 117 was sharp resistance, and Black cauught up with the trade up to Black 135.

Black attacked White’s center stones from 147 to Black 159, but White’s responses were excellent to save all of his stones to win.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/12\/Ida-Atsushi-vs-Choi-Cheolhan-20151128.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Choi Cheolhan 9 dan, reviewing the game.

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Choi Cheolhan 9 dan, reviewing the game.

Choi Cheolhan vs Gu Li – Game 7

Black 11, 13 and 19 were new style of play, but White didn’t complain with 12 and 18.

Black 31 would have wedged at White 32.

After White became thick in the bottom left, cutting at White 44 to 46 was very powerful.

Black started to attack White’s center group with 63, but White 72 was a skillful tesuji to capture Black’s key stones.

White 82 and 84 were a strong attack, and it was difficult for Black to mange, because of the ko at White 90.

While Black was eliminating the ko with Black 109, White captured Black’s left side group through to 110, and White was satisfied.

Black 111, 113, 131, 141 and Black 145 were tricky moves to answer, but Gu’s responses were solid and correct to maintain his lead until the end of the game.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/12\/Choi-Cheolhan-vs-Gu-Li-20151129.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Kono Rin 9 dan, deciding their colors.

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Kono Rin 9 dan, deciding their colors.

Kono Rin vs Gu Li – Game 8

The opening up to White 34 was peaceful.

Black 37 to 41 was creative, and the trade up to Black 45 was favorable for Black.

White 62 was indirect reinforcement, and White lived completely up to 68.

White 76 to Black 81 helped Black, and Black’s play from 83 was flawless to take the lead.

Black 103 was thick, and Black 115 was big to maintain his lead.

White 134 and 136 were tricky probes, and Black 137 was a crucial mistake.

White 138 to Black 149 was one way street, and White 152 was the winning shot.

Black lost nearly 15 points up to Black 167, and the game was decided.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display4″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/12\/Kono-Rin-vs-Gu-Li-20151130.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwan 9 dan, the last game from round 2.

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwan 9 dan, the last game from round 2.

Park Jungwhan vs Gu Li – Game 9

Black 33 and 35 were gentle attack, and the result up to Black 59 was good for Black, because White’s right side is a ko.

White started to attack with 60, but Black 61 to 71 were exquisite, and Black 79 was a strong counter.

Black’s sequence from 95 to 107 was sophisticated, and Black was still ahead

White 110 to 114 were exquisite sequence, and White caught up a bit with 116.

Black 127 was a serious overplay, and that should be at White 130.

Black 151 was the prepared tesuji, but the trade up to White 170 was good for White, and the game was reversed.

Black played aggressively with 185, 193, 207, and 223 to catch up, but Gu’s endgame was perfect enough to save a small margin.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display5″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/12\/Park-Jungwhan-vs-Gu-Li-20151201.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1NqhOhx

Gu Li vs Park Jungwhan in Nongshim Cup Monday Night

Tonight’s Nongshim Cup game — which will be broadcast on the AGA’s YouTube channel starting at 9:30pm PST – is Gu Li vs Park Jungwhan. “We were actually the 2nd most watched live show on Youtube Gaming last night in that coveted 12:00am PST/3:00am EST timeslot,” reports Andrew Jackson. “That put us on the front page of gaming.youtube.com and got us a lot of random ‘foot traffic.’  Too bad the show isn’t more geared towards beginners!”
Note: Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to get these updates in real time! 

via American Go E-Journal http://ift.tt/1IxyUo4

How Do Online Ratings Compare? OGS Seeks Input for Ratings Survey

How do you know what rank to choose when checking out a new go server? Maybe you visited Sensei’s World Wide Rank Comparisonmaybe you guessed. “The team at OGS wants to dispel some of this mystery, so we’ve created a quick and easy survey to collect feedback about ranks of popular servers and we’d really appreciate your participation,” says Akita Noek. The brief survey takes less than two minutes to complete and you can see the results as soon as you are done. “So far we’ve garnered about 650 responses, but only 86 data points contain AGA data, which is a little over half of what we have for the EGF (146 responses),” says Noek, “so we’d really like to fill that gap a bit in order to get a good rank mapping to and from AGA ranks for the various servers.”

“The results will be used by OGS to further refine our rankings and ratings and bring our system in line with our users’ expectations,” says Noek. “We’re collecting rank data for all the main major servers as well as the AGA and EGF, as well as community impressions about how they feel about the ranks on different servers/organizations. We’ll be making the results of the survey public in both a summarized form as well as the raw data for anyone to use.”

via American Go E-Journal http://ift.tt/1Niq6DH

The Power Report: Iyama regains sextuple crown; Surprise leader in Honinbo League; Women’s Meijin League; Judan semifinalists; Xie regains Women’s Honinbo title

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal

Iyama regains sextuple crown: The third game of the 41st Tengen title match was held at the Munakata Yurix in Munakata City, 2015.11.29_41tengen-IyamaFukuoka Prefecture on November 25. Taking black, Iyama Yuta (right) forced Takao Shinji (left, in white shirt) to resign after 147 moves. Iyama took a 2015.11.29_41tengen_02decisive lead in the first large fight of the game and wrapped it up by killing a large group. This win won back the title he lost to Takao on December 19 last year. He also once again held six of the top seven titles; this is his third sextuple crown. Overall, this is his 34th title, and his winning streak is now 24, which puts him in equal second place in modern tournament records with Rin Kaiho, Hon. Tengen. With his twelfth successive win in title matches, he also equals another record, one set by Sakata Eio. Iyama’s cumulative record in title matches is 100 wins to 49 losses, a winning percentage of 67.1%. (Note: the Munakata Yurix is an elaborate complex of facilities including a large library, planetarium, various halls, and sporting facilities.)

Surprise leader in Honinbo League: A surprising player has taken the sole lead after just two rounds in the 71st Honinbo League. The2015.11.29_honinbo-league final game of the second round was played on November 26, and league newcomer Motoki Katsuya 7P (W) beat Yamashita Keigo 9P, the top-ranked player in the league, by 1.5 points. Motoki is the only player on 2-0.

Women’s Meijin League: In a game played on November 26, Chinen Kaori 5P picked up her first win. Playing white, she beat Kato Keiko 6P by resignation. Chinen was already doomed to lose her league 2015.11.29-women's-meijin-leagueplace, but this win ensured that she had the company of Kato (both are on 1-4).

Judan semifinalists: In the Judan tournament, in which the focus of interest is Iyama’s attempt to go for a genuine grand slam, two more semifinalists have been decided. Imamura Toshiya 9P beat Ichiriki Ryo 7P and will face Iyama in one semifinal. Shida Tatsuya 7P beat Kobayashi Satoru 9P and will meet either Yo Seiki 7P or Takao Shinji 9P in the other semifinal.

Xie regains Women’s Honinbo title: After a gap of two terms, Xie Yimin has won back the Women’s Honinbo title. The fifth game of the 2015.11.29_34fhoninbo5_234th title match was played at the Nihon Ki-in on November 27. Taking white, Xie (right) won by resignation after 272 moves. Fujisawa Rina (left) had looked like defending her title when she won the first two games, but then Xie made a stubborn fightback to take the next three. As she also holds the Women’s Meijin and Women’s Kisei titles, Xie once again has a triple crown.

Retirement: Ogoshi Ichiro 8P retired as of November 30. Born in Oita Prefecture on November 7, 1954, Ogoshi became a disciple of Kitani Minoru and made pro 1-dan in 1976. He reached 8-dan in 1999. After retirement, he plans to devote himself to spreading go in Kushiro City, Hokkaido.

via American Go E-Journal http://ift.tt/1Itm5er

Japanese Go Exchange Visits Mexico

7“Mexico gladly welcomed the Sociedad Internacional de Intercambio de Go  (SIIG) from Japan, for the first three days of October,” reports Sid Avila. SIIG is a delegation of players, built mainly by retired business men and women, who travel around the world playing and sharing through go.

This is the fourth time SIIG has visited Mexico, and they went to three locations on this trip: Pipiolo art elementary school where Siddhartha Avila teaches a curricular go program; National University, where Emil Garcia leads a team of instructors who teach at open workshops; and Ejoki Buddhist Temple where Ricardo Quintero teaches go on weekends.

Ms. Marcela Zepeda, the principal of  Pipiolo, introduced the Japanese group to the students on the first day. The children performed traditional dances and Mexican songs, followed by a rengo atari-go game with kindergarden children, and a three round pair-go tournament with 36 pairs of Japanese go players and Mexican school children mixed.

The university venue, on October 2nd, was the Contemporary Arts University Museum square, where a Mexico-Japan tournament was held in a 4 round system. Japan won all four rounds and a crystal tablet was given to  SIIG President Sugime Masanao by Daniel Morales, the Mexican Go Association’s treasurer, as acknowledgment of their visit. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor, with Emil Garcia and Sid Avila. 

via American Go E-Journal http://ift.tt/1IsNOvK

Iyama Yuta wins 41st Tengen and 63rd Oza

Iyama Yuta 9p came back to Tengen by defeating Takao Shinji 9p with a 3-0 score.

The 41st Tengen final, game 3 was played on November 25, 2015 in Fukuoka, Japan, and Iyama Yuta won by resignation at 147 moves.

Takao Shinji 9 dan (left) and Iyama Yuta 9 dan at the 41st Tengen final.

Takao Shinji 9 dan (left) and Iyama Yuta 9 dan at the 41st Tengen final.

 

Return match of Tengen

In 2014, Takao Shinji challenged for the 40th Tengen, and he defeated Iyama Yuta with a 3-2 score to become a new Tengen.

However, Takao didn’t succeed to defend Tengen title against Iyama.

This year, Iyama Yuta defeated Yuki Satoshi 9p at the challenger deciding match, and he became a challenger.

Game one of the final, Iyama built a big moyo over the center for Black, and White invaded. Black attacked White’s invading stones fiercely, and there was a serious capturing race in the center.

Iyama Yuta 9 dan, reviewing the game just after finishing game 3.

Iyama Yuta 9 dan, reviewing the game just after finishing game 3.

Unfortunately for White, Black had one more liberty to win the race, and the game was over at the same time.

In game two, the opening was relatively peaceful, but Iyama started to play aggressively after he failed fighting at the top.

Takao (Black) was clearly ahead up to 81, and Black maintained his lead until the end of middle game.

However, Black 149 was a crucial mistake, and White caught up through to 180. The game was still very close, but Iyama showed his special technique, and he won the game by half a point.

In game three, Takao seemed to lose his fighting spirit after losing his won game in game two. Iyama showed his power through the game, and he captured White’s huge group to finish the series.

Iyama had held Tengen for three years from 2011 to 2013, so this was his forth Tengen title.

Another return match of Oza

Iyama Yuta 9 dan (left) and Murakawa Daisuke 8 dan, reviewing game 2 from the 63rd Oza final.

Iyama Yuta 9 dan (left) and Murakawa Daisuke 8 dan, reviewing game 2 from the 63rd Oza final.

Meanwhile, there was another title match played between Iyama Yuta 9p and Murakawa Daisuke 8p.

Murakawa challenged for 62nd Oza last year, and he defeated Iyama to become a new Oza.

That was very surprising and sensational, because it was the first time that Iyama lost to a younger player than him in the final match.

This year, Iyama defeated Yo Seiki (Taiwanese name Yu Zhengqi) 7p at the challenger deciding match, and he became a challenger for another return match of 63rd Oza.

Game one of the final was very exciting with a whole board fighting. Murakawa (White) took the lead at the fighting on the left side, and he was leading in the middle game.

However, White 140 was careless, and Black 141 to 145 were exquisite sequence to help his left side group, and his left side group lived in sente up to White 150.

Black’s sequence from Black 151 to 165 was bold and severe, and Black caught up through a big trade up to White 172.

Iyama Yuta 9 dan, reviewing game 3 from the 63rd Oza final.

Iyama Yuta 9 dan, reviewing game 3 from the 63rd Oza final.

The game was very close, but Iyama managed to win by half a point, and that was a painful defeat for Murakawa.

After losing game one, Murakawa appeared to be too disappointed, and he didn’t show his strength next two games.

Iyama won game two and three relatively easily, and he returned to Oza with a 3-0 score on November 19, 2015.

He had held the Oza in 2012 and 2013, so this was his third Oza title.

Iyama Yuta’s ambitions

Iyama’s been holding Kisei, Meijin, Honinbo, Gosei, and he’s just returned to Tengen and Oza, so he’s holding six out of seven major titles in Japan.

Judan is the only title which is out of reach from Iyama Yuta, and Ida Atsushi 8p defeated Takao Shinji 9p to become a new Judan in April, 2015.

So far, he is proceeded to the semifinals of the 54th Judan, and is going to play against Imamura Toshiya 9p next.

It will be interesting to see if or not Iyama’s dreams of achieving the gland slam of Japanese Go, by claiming all seven major titles simultaneously will come true in 2016.

Game records of 41st Tengen

Iyama Yuta vs Takao Shinji – Game 1

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/11\/Iyama-Yuta-vs-Takao-Shinji-20151023.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Takao Shinji vs Iyama Yuta – Game 2

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/11\/Takao-Shinji-vs-Iyama-Yuta-20151116.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Iyama Yuta vs Takao Shinji – Game 3

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/11\/Iyama-Yuta-vs-Takao-Shinji-20151125.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Game records of 63rd Oza

Iyama Yuta vs Murakawa Daisuke – Game 1

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display4″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/11\/Iyama-Yuta-vs-Murakawa-Daisuke-20151020.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Murakawa Daisuke vs Iyama Yuta – Game 2

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display5″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/11\/Murakawa-Daisuke-vs-Iyama-Yuta-20151112.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Iyama Yuta vs Murakawa Daisuke – Game 3

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display6″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/11\/Iyama-Yuta-vs-Murakawa-Daisuke-20151119.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1jqQPWV

Myungwan Kim to broadcast Nongshim Cup games Sunday and Monday

The last few games of the current stage of the Nongshim Cup will be broadcast on the AGA’s YouTube channel Sunday and Monday nights, 2015.11.28_Ichiriki-Ryo-Nongshim-Cupstarting at 9:30pm PST.

The Nongshim Cup is a major international championship with each country fielding a team of five players. The tournament is a “win and continue” format, where the winning player will continue to face opponents from the other countries, alternating, until only one country has any players remaining. This year, for instance, Ichiriki Ryo (right) put Japan off to a great start by winning the first three games (see GoGameGuru’s report here)

Adding to the complications, the teams get to keep the order of their roster a secret: Gu Li or Choi Cheolhan will play the next player on the Japanese roster — but Japan won’t announce their next player until after Saturday’s match.

“It’s a complicated format to describe, but ultimately each country is bringing their strongest players. Each national organization takes this competition extremely seriously, and we should get some real fireworks,” said the AGA’s Andrew Jackson, “I’m really thrilled Myungwan Kim has been organizing these broadcasts and I’m excited to see some world-class go!”

The remaining players on the Japanese side are Murakawa Taiske, Gono Lin, and Iyama Yuta. The remaining players for China are Lian Xiao, Ke Jie, and Gu Li. Korea still has Lee Sedol, Choi Cheolhan, and Park Jungwhan.

via American Go E-Journal http://ift.tt/1NiKrwQ

Your Move/Readers Write: “Tokyo Newcomer” Games Realistic, Redmond Says

“I just found ‘Tokyo Newcomer‘ on the net,” writes Michael Redmond 9P, “but I see that you covered it in the ‘Go Spotting’ column in 2014. The 2015.11.28_newcomer-screenshotgames in the movie were realistic, and there is a scene about 36 minutes into it that shows pros playing in what looks like elimination rounds for a hayago tournament. In this scene the main character is playing against Matsumoto Takehisa 7P. Takemiya Yoko 5P poses as a TV analyst for a game later.”  

via American Go E-Journal http://ift.tt/1PTsJlU

New Multiplayer Consultation Go Server Launches

A new consultation game go server, ConGo launched recently and has already attracted nearly 900 players to the Massively Multiplayer 2015.11.28_Go-ConConsultation Go Server. “The idea of this experiment is that we wanted to get as many people as possible to focus on the direction of one game,” says creator Jay Chan. “The hope is that we’ll create a high quality game that weaker players can learn from, and stronger players can debate on.” As of November 10 the game was on move 46 with over 2000 votes cast by about 100 active players. “The server itself is still under constant development, with the last major feature being a chat,” Chan tells the E-Journal. “Jiang MingJiu 7P has agreed to review this game.”

via American Go E-Journal http://ift.tt/1jpPsro