Reader feedback on “Capture Go”

In last week’s EJ, Memphis organizer Jay Jayaraman described his use of “Capture Go” as a standalone in his teaching program, rather than as a “gateway to go.” He calls the game he teaches “go,” a practice that veteran organizer Jean DeMaiffe, a graduate of Yasuda Sensei’s International Go Teacher Certification Program,  questions:

“I am wondering if there is a typographical error in  last week’s ‘Capture Go’ story, when Mr. Jayaraman says, ‘We call the game we teach go, not Capture Go.’ Surely the organizers are going to call their game ‘Capture Go’ or better still, as Yasuda-sensei calls it, ‘The Capture Game’.  I have taught ‘The Capture Game’ as part of my Go curriculum for years and can readily attest to the importance of clearly differentiating between the goals of the two games.  After learning to play capture, most of my students consistently need to be refocused on capturing territory, rather than just stones.Thanks for your help in setting one or more of us straight on this issue.”
Jayaraman responds:

“Our curriculum is meant to serve less as an introduction to regulation go than as an in-depth introduction to the underlying principles of the game. These include the basic rules of stone placement, liberties (which we call ‘escape routes”‘, and capturing, as well as the traditions of the game like etiquette, problem study, and history. Capture Go is especially  well-suited for this purpose. Capture Go is an accessible and engaging short-form version of go, anyone can learn its simple rule-set, and it has enough innate complexity to be challenging to any age group.

“Our use of the term ‘go’ is also rooted in some practical considerations. Our program is primarily focused on equipping teachers with no prior knowledge of go with the skills, supplies, and support to be able to introduce their students to the game. In many cases these classes may be the only time they ever hear of the game. For those whose interest in regular go is sparked, however, they and their families will be familiar enough with the game to seek out more information about it, and hopefully utilize the existing resources in our community, like the Memphis Go Club or the introductory regulation go workshops the Confucius Institute at the University of Memphis offers.  For these students who pursue it, the precise name of the specific rule variation that first set them on the path of go will probably be inconsequential.

“Our curriculum’s primary purpose is to develop the critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative communication skills of the students our instructors reach. Our secondary purpose is introduce go to the widest possible audience, and in doing so instill in these students an experiential understanding of Asian culture. Fostering public interest through Capture Go is important for the go community as a whole, and we hope that our ideas create some ‘aji’ for further discussion and development.”

 

Our curriculum is meant to serve less as an introduction to regulation go than as an in-depth introduction to the underlying principles of the game. These include the basic rules of stone placement, liberties (which we call “escape routes”), and capturing, as well as the traditions of the game like etiquette, problem study, and history. Capture Go is especially  well-suited for this purpose. Capture Go is an accessible and engaging short-form version of go, anyone can learn its simple rule-set, and it has enough innate complexity to be challenging to any age group.

Our use of the term “go” is also rooted in some practical considerations. Our program is primarily focused on equipping teachers with no prior knowledge of go with the skills, supplies, and support to be able to introduce their students to the game. In many cases these classes may be the only time they ever hear of the game. For those whose interest in regular go is sparked, however, they and their families will be familiar enough with the game to seek out more information about it, and hopefully utilize the existing resources in our community, like the Memphis Go Club or the introductory regulation go workshops the CIUM offers.  For these students who pursue it, the precise name of the specific rule variation that first set them on the path of go will probably be inconsequential.

Our curriculum’s primary purpose is to develop the critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative communication skills of the students our instructors reach. Our secondary purpose is introduce go to the widest possible audience, and in doing so instill in these students an experiential understanding of Asian culture. Fostering public interest through Capture Go is important for the go community as a whole, and we hope that our ideas serve as “aji” for further discussion and development.

 

via American Go E-Journal http://www.usgo.org/news/2013/10/reader-feedback-on-capture-go/

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