Weekly Go problems: Week 140

Here are the weekly Go problems for week 140.

Black plays first in all problems and all solutions are labeled ‘correct’. Have fun!

Easy Go problem

One of the Golden Rules of Go is “take care of yourself when attacking.”

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-easy-140.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the easy problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Intermediate Go problem

There are two basic tactics in capturing races; reduce liberties or increase them. You’ll need special tesuji here.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-intermediate-140.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the intermediate problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Hard Go problem

The aji in Black’s lone cutting stone is surprisingly strong! Just be careful in the corner.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-hard-140.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the hard problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Still want more Go problems?

You can find Go books packed full of life and death problems, tesuji problems and other valuable Go knowledge at the Go Game Shop.

Discuss other possible moves

If you have any questions or want to discuss any of these problems, please leave a comment below at any time. You can use the coordinates on the problem images to discuss a move or sequence of moves.

You can also download the solutions as a PDF or SGF file by clicking the links below each problem.

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1j5bSOP

Weekly Go problems: Week 139

Here are the weekly Go problems for week 139.

Black plays first in all problems and all solutions are labeled ‘correct’. Have fun!

Easy Go problem

When you’re trying to reduce a group’s liberties, it’s usually better not to allow it to extend in a straight line.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-easy-139.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the easy problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Intermediate Go problem

Separating White’s groups is surprisingly tricky. You’ll need to have a tesuji prepared.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-intermediate-139.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the intermediate problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Hard Go problem

It looks like White has miai to kill Black, but you can tide things over with a series of sente moves.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-hard-139.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the hard problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Still want more Go problems?

You can find Go books packed full of life and death problems, tesuji problems and other valuable Go knowledge at the Go Game Shop.

Discuss other possible moves

If you have any questions or want to discuss any of these problems, please leave a comment below at any time. You can use the coordinates on the problem images to discuss a move or sequence of moves.

You can also download the solutions as a PDF or SGF file by clicking the links below each problem.

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1VrQPaP

No Learn Go Week in 2015

sad-kuro-on-desert-island

Kuro won’t be organizing Learn Go Week in 2015.

Last year, in cooperation with the international Go community, we started a new event called Learn Go Week.

Unfortunately, I’m writing today to let you know that we won’t be able to coordinate Learn Go Week in 2015.

We had planned for Learn Go Week to be an annual event, and it would have taken place around this time of year, but our resources have been stretched very thin this year and we simply don’t have the capacity to organize another event in 2015.

I’m very sorry to disappoint those of you who were looking forward to Learn Go Week this year and really regret that we couldn’t make it happen.

We hope to be able to restart Learn Go Week in 2016, from September 10 to September 18. And if things improve, we would still like to make it an annual event, starting on the second weekend of September.

Let’s start planning for 2016 now!

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1VtQ37N

Go Commentary – Zhou Ruiyang vs Park Junghwan – 2nd MLily Cup

This game is from the 2nd MLily Cup, round of 16.
It was played by Zhou Ruiyang 9p and Park Junghwan 9p on August 30, 2015, in Guangzhou, China.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Park Junghwan

Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Park Junghwna 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Park Junghwan has held the #1 more than two years in Korea.

He won the 19th LG Cup in February, 2015, by defeating Kim Jiseok 9p, and that was his second international title.

he probed that he’s ranked #1 in the world according to Dr Bai Taeil’s rating system, which is used by the Korean Baduk Association.

In June, 2015, he reached the final of the 27th Asian TV Cup, but he lost to Lee Sedol 9p.

His style of play is hard to describe. That’s because he plays very flexibly and his moves are well balanced between the power and skill. He’s not very good at attacking, and that seems to be his only weakness so far.

Zhou Ruiyang

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup.

Zhou Ruiyang is currently ranked #5 in China.

He won the 1st Bailing Cup by defeating Chen Yaoye 9p in early 2013, and that was his first international title.

In 2014, he proceeded to the final of the 18th LG Cup to challenge for another title, but he lost to Tuo Jiaxi 9p.

In June, 2015, Zhou was in the final of the 10th Chunlan Cup, but he didn’t succeed to add another international title by losing against Gu Li 9p.

His style of play is practical and cool, and he’s very good at shape. However, he’s very weak against Park Junghwan, and he only won 1 out of 9 against Park before this game.

That’s very unbalanced between world champion players, and let’s see if Zhou has formed his secret strategy against his natural enemy in this game.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the beginning of their game.

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) and Park Junghwna 9 dan at the beginning of their game.

Commented game record

Zhou Ruiyang vs Park Junghwan

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Zhou-Ruiyang-vs-Park-Junghwan-Commentary-An-Younggil.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1KSLGSa

Yu Zhiying’s 2015 Samsung Cup breakthrough

Yu Zhiying 5p stunned everyone this week, by defeating heavyweights Mok Jinseok 9p and Choi Cheolhan 9p, in her breakthrough performance at a major international tournament.

Yu Zhiying 5 dan: The marketing department at Samsung need to get Yu a Samsung Galaxy... pronto!

Yu Zhiying 5 dan: The marketing department at Samsung need to get Yu a Samsung Galaxy… pronto!

From September 8-10, players from China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan and the USA gathered in Beijing, China for the group stage of the 2015 Samsung Cup.

Yu’s impressive play earned her a spot in the upcoming round of 16, as the only woman remaining at this stage of the tournament.

Yu Zhiying

11 year old Yu won two gold medals at the 1st Chinese National Mind Games.

11 year old Yu won two gold medals at the 1st Chinese National Mind Games.

Yu first came to the Go world’s attention in 2009.

At the tender age of just 11, she scooped up two gold medals at the 1st Chinese National Mind Games, in the amateur division.

Since turning pro, she’s become quite a formidable opponent among female professionals.

2014 was her most successful year (until now), because she won the 21st Xinren Wang (Rookies’ Cup).

Day one

(Note: the Samsung Cup is a bit different to other Go tournaments, click here to learn how it works.)

Yu Zhiying defeated Mok Jinseok 9p on the first day of play. That caused quite a stir, because Mok is the current GS Caltex Cup title holder in Korea and has been a consistent performer for over a decade.

Mok Jinseok 9 dan (left) faces Yu Zhiying 5 dan on day one of the group stage.

Mok Jinseok 9 dan (left) faces Yu Zhiying 5 dan on day one of the group stage.

China’s top rated player, Shi Yue 9p lost to Park Younghun 9p. The latter seems to be in excellent form lately.

Japan’s Yoda Norimoto 9p was the oldest player in the group stage and he almost defeated Park Junghwan 9p. Yoda was ahead, but he couldn’t maintain his lead until the very end, and eventually lost by half a point.

Korea’s Choi Jung was defeated by Zhang Tao 4p in her first game.

The USA’s Benjamin Lockhart 7d, the only Western representative in the group stage, was defeated by Gan Siyang 4p.

Benjamin Lockhart (right) at the 2015 Samsung Cup.

Benjamin Lockhart 7 dan (amateur, right) at the 2015 Samsung Cup.

Gan is well known for his unconventional openings. In his game with Lockhart (below) he played a 6-4, 6-4 opening, which is fairly tame by Gan’s standards, but was still interesting!

Day two

Koreans Park Junghwan 9p, Lee Sedol 9p, Kim Jiseok 9p, Park Younghun 9p and Lee Changho 9p chalked up two wins each and proceeded through to the round of 16.

Front row from left: Kim Jiseok 9 dan, Park Younghun 9 dan, Lee Sedol 9 dan and Lee Changho 9 dan.

Front row from left: Kim Jiseok 9 dan, Park Younghun 9 dan, Lee Sedol 9 dan and Lee Changho 9 dan.

 

Ke Jie 9p, Tang Weixing 9p and Jiang Weijie 9p also qualified for China, leaving eight places to be decided on day three.

Japan's Ida Atsushi 8 dan was knocked out in the group stage.

Japan’s Ida Atsushi 8 dan defeated Choi Jung 6 dan, but was knocked out of the group stage on day three.

Choi Jung 6p lost to Japan’s Ida Atsushi 8p and was knocked out. Choi’s elimination left Yu Zhiying as the only woman remaining in play.

Yoda and Lockhart faced one another and Lockhart was eliminated.

 

Day three

The third and final day of the group stage was the last chance for players with one win and one loss to stay in contention.

Yu Zhiying knocked out another Korean title holder (Choi Cheolhan 9p), astonishing onlookers and becoming the darling of the media for the round. The game record is below.

Yu Zhiying 5 dan (right) knocked out Choi Cheolhan 9 dan on day three!

Yu Zhiying 5 dan (right) knocked out Choi Cheolhan 9 dan on day three!

Chinese representatives Shi Yue 9p, Yu Zhiying 5p, Zhou Hexi 5p, Zhang Tao 4p and Gan Siyang 4p survived the round.

Meanwhile Na Hyun 6p, Byun Sangi 4p and Kim Dongho 4p bolstered Korea’s representation in the next round.

Unfortunately, none of the players from Japan, Taiwan or the USA were able to run the gauntlet of the group stage, leaving only Chinese and Korean representatives in the next round.

The knockout phase

When the Samsung Cup resumes, from October 6-8, 2015, Yu Zhiying will come up against her toughest opponent yet – none other than Lee Sedol 9p!

The next two rounds of the 2015 Samsung Cup will be in Gyeonggi-do, Korea. Here are the full pairings for the round of 16:

  • Na Hyun 6p vs Ke Jie 9p
  • Kim Jiseok 9p vs Shi Yue 9p
  • Kim Dongho 4p vs Jiang Weijie 9p
  • Lee Changho 9p vs Tang Weixing 9p
  • Park Junghwan 9p vs Zhou Hexi 5p
  • Byun Sangil 4p vs Gan Siyang 4p
  • Lee Sedol 9p vs Yu Zhiying 5p
  • Park Younghun 9p vs Zhang Tao 4p.
Kim Jiseok terrorizing everyone with Go problems, as usual.

Kim Jiseok terrorizing everyone with Go problems, as usual.

Will Yu Zhiying’s dream run continue?

I’m excited to see Yu’s success in this tournament so far and hope that she can continue her run in the next round.

Go Game Guru readers have been following her career for several years now, and the 16 year old is approaching the age where many top players win their first major tournament.

Can she do it?

Lee Sedol is an incredibly formidable player, but he’s not invincible.

I’ll be back next month to pick up where we left off with the round of 16!

Subscribe to our weekly Go newsletter so that you don’t miss anything.

And let me know what your predictions for the next round are below!

More photos

Yu-Zhiying-20th-Samsung-Cup
Yu-Zhiying-2009-1st-China-National-Mind-Games
Mok-Jinseok-Yu-Zhiying-20th-Samsung-Cup
Tang-Weixing-Yu-Zhiying-20th-Samsung-Cup
Choi-Cheolhan-Yu-Zhiying-20th-Samsung-Cup
Yoda-Norimoto-Gan-Siyang-20th-Samsung-Cup
Team-Korea-20th-Samsung-Cup
Kim-Jiseok-Park-Younghun-Lee-Sedol-20th-Samsung-Cup-1
Kim-Jiseok-Park-Younghun-Lee-Sedol-20th-Samsung-Cup
Group-stage-winners-20th-Samsung-Cup
Seo-Bongsu-20th-Samsung-Cup
Ida-Atsushi-20th-Samsung-Cup
Lin-Junyan-20th-Samsung-Cup
Ben-Lockhart-20th-Samsung-Cup
Liu-Xiaoguang-20th-Samsung-Cup

The Samsung Cup

The Samsung Cup first started in 1996 and uses a rather convoluted draw. Though, arguably, it is fairer than a straight knockout format.

The 32 players in the main draw are split into 8 groups of 4. Players must win two games in order to proceed from the first stage; two players from each group will advance to the knockout stage.

In some ways it’s similar to the group stage of the FIFA World Cup, except that only two wins are necessary to continue.

The round of 16 and the quarter finals are played as a straight knockout.

The semifinals and the final are played as best of three matches.

The time limit for games is 2 hours and 5 x 1 minute byo-yomi.

Samsung is a well known Korean conglomerate.

Game records

Yu Zhiying vs Choi Cheolhan

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Yu-Zhiying-vs-Choi-Cheolhan-20150910.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Shi Yue vs Park Younghun

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Shi-Yue-vs-Park-Younghun-20150908.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Yoda Norimoto vs Park Junghwan

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Yoda-Norimoto-vs-Park-Jungwhan-20150908.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Lee Sedol vs Ida Atsushi

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display4″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Lee-Sedol-vs-Ida-Atsushi-20150908.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Benjamin Lockhart vs Gan Siyang

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display5″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Benjamin-Lockhart-vs-Gan-Siyang-20150908.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Ke Jie vs Peng Liyao

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display6″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Ke-Jie-vs-Peng-Liyao-20150909.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1OF2BHf

Go Commentary: Tang Weixing vs Lee Sedol – 2nd MLily Cup

This game is from the quarter finals of the 2nd MLily Cup.

It game was played by Tang Weixing 9p and Lee Sedol 9p on September 1, 2015, in Guangzhou, China.

Lee Sedol 9 dan (left) and Tang Weixing 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup, quarter finals.

Lee Sedol 9 dan (left) and Tang Weixing 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup quarter finals.

Tang Weixing

Tang Weixing is ranked #10 in China, and he was the winner of the 2013 Samsung Cup.

Tang Weixing 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup, quarter finals.

Tang Weixing 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup, quarter finals.

He defeated Shi Yue 9p in the 2013 Samsung Cup semifinals, and faced Lee Sedol in the final.

Many Go fans expected Lee Sedol to take home another international title, because Tang was still relatively unknown back then.

However, Tang showed his strength and power, and defeated Lee 2-0 to win his first career title.

He hadn’t even won any domestic titles in China at the time, so he made a rapid transition from dark horse to world champion.

With his victory and others, Chinese players swept all the international individual titles for the first time in 2013.

In 2014, Tang won the 13th Xinan Wang, defeating Chang Hao 9p in the final, and he defended the title against Shi Yue 9p, who is ranked #1 in China, this year.

He also proceeded to the final of the 2014 Samsung Cup, defeating Park Junghwan 9p in the semifinals as defending champion.

However, he couldn’t maintain his grip on the Samsung Cup and he lost the final to Kim Jiseok 9p 2-0.

Tang’s style of play is territorial and persistent. He’s very good at sabaki, so he doesn’t mind complicated battles in his opponent’s sphere of influence.

In this MLily Cup, Tang defeated Yuki Satoshi 9p, Kong Jie 9p and Li Qincheng 1p respectively en route to the quarter finals.

Lee Sedol

Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup, quarter finals.

Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup, quarter finals.

Lee Sedol is currently ranked #2 in Korea, just behind the younger Park Junghwan 9p.

Kim Jiseok 9p held the #2 position for more than a year, but Lee has made a comeback to #2 with a higher winning percentage lately.

Just four days before this game, he won the 27th Asian TV Cup.

He played wonderfully against Park Junghwan 9p in the final, adding a 4th Asian TV Cup to his international record.

He hasn’t won any domestic Korean titles in 2015 so far, but he’s still very powerful when he’s in good form.

As we discussed above, Lee lost the 2013 Samsung Cup to Tang Weixing, so this was his opportunity for reprisal.

These two haven’t met in any other tournaments. This was only their 3rd game together.

In this MLily Cup, Lee defeated Xie Erhao 2p, Byun Sangil 4p and Ding Hao 2p respectively, starting in from the round of 64.

Anyway, let’s have a look at Lee and Tang’s interesting game.

Tang Weixing 9 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan  at the night before the quarter finals.

Tang Weixing 9 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan on the night before the quarter finals.

Commented game record

Tang Weixing vs Lee Sedol

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Tang-Weixing-vs-Lee-Sedol-20150901-Commentary-An-Younggil.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1EXVKsi

Weekly Go problems: Week 137

Here are the weekly Go problems for week 137.

Black plays first in all problems and all solutions are labeled ‘correct’. Have fun!

Easy Go problem

Sacrificing stones can be powerful tactic in a capturing race.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-easy-137.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the easy problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Intermediate Go problem

This looks like a bit like joseki, but White is refusing to compromise…

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-intermediate-137.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the intermediate problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Hard Go problem

We’re continuing with the theme of this week’s easy problem, but you’ll need some sharper tesuji this time.

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/go-problems\/ggg-hard-137.sgf”,”sgfDefaults”:{“widgetType”:”STANDARD_PROBLEM”},”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Download the solutions to the hard problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Still want more Go problems?

You can find Go books packed full of life and death problems, tesuji problems and other valuable Go knowledge at the Go Game Shop.

Discuss other possible moves

If you have any questions or want to discuss any of these problems, please leave a comment below at any time. You can use the coordinates on the problem images to discuss a move or sequence of moves.

You can also download the solutions as a PDF or SGF file by clicking the links below each problem.

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1JSo2l2

Korean pros dominate 2nd MLily Cup – Round of 16 and quarter final wrap up

The round of 16 and the quarter finals of the 2nd MLily Cup took place on August 30 and September 1, 2015, in Guangzhou, China.

It was a showdown between China and Korea, with Japanese and Taiwanese players eliminated in earlier rounds.

Defeating a natural enemy

Zhou Ruiyang 9p defeated Park Junghwan 9p in a very meaningful victory for Zhou.

Zhou Ruiyang 9dan defeats natural enemy Park Junghwan 9p

Zhou Ruiyang 9 dan (left) defeats natural enemy Park Junghwan 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup

Their head to head record before this game stood at 8-1 in Park’s favor, which is very unbalanced between world champion players.

However, Zhou’s excellent sabaki in this game was a tour de force and he was able to overcome his natural enemy.

Upset of the round

Ahn Seongjun 6p caused a stir by unexpectedly upsetting Chinese heavyweight, Tuo Jiaxi 9p.

An Sungjoon 6 dan (left) upsets world champion, Tuo Jiaxi 9 dan (right) at the 2nd MLily Cup

An Sungjoon 6 dan (left) upsets world champion, Tuo Jiaxi 9 dan at the 2nd MLily Cup

Other round of 16 games

Lee Sedol 9p and Park Younghun 9p easily defeated their respective opponents, Ding Hao 2p and Chinese veteran, Chang Hao 9p.

Rong Yi 4p defeated Kim Sedong 5p by a half a point in the only game not decided by resignation.

Tang Weixing 9p, Ke Jie 9p and Xie Ke 1p were too good for fellow countrymen, Li Qincheng 1p, Wang Zejin 3p and Wu Guangya 6p.

Quarter finals

After a brief day’s respite, eight remaining players regrouped to vie for a spot in the semifinal.

Ahn Seongjun 6p continued his run by defeating China’s Xie Ke 1p.

An will take on Lee Sedol 9p, who ended Tang Weixing’s hopes to proceed to the quarter finals.

An Sungjoon 6 dan (left) delighted to take on Lee Sedol 9 dan (right) in the 2nd MLily Cup semifinal

An Sungjoon 6 dan (left) delighted to take on Lee Sedol 9 dan in the 2nd MLily Cup semifinal

Park Younghun 9p halted Zhou Ruiyang’s run in fine form.

Park will face China’s sole hope in the semifinal, Ke Jie 9p, who bested Rong Yi 4p.

Ke Jie 9 dan (left) will take on Park Younghun 9 dan (right) in the semifinals of the 2nd MLily Cup

Ke Jie 9 dan (left) will take on Park Younghun 9 dan (right) in the semifinals of the 2nd MLily Cup

MLily Cup

The MLily Cup is a biennial international Go tournament, which started in 2013 and is sponsored by MLily Meng Baihe – a mattress and bedding company.

It’s intended that it will alternate with the (also biennial) Bailing Cup, every other year.

The draw consists of 16 seeded players from China, Korea, Japan and Taiwan and 48 players from preliminary rounds, including 4 women and 4 amateurs.

Each player receives 2 hours thinking time and 5 x 1 minute byo-yomi. The main time is increased to 3 hours each for the final. The semifinals are played as best of three matches and the final is a best of five match.

The winner receives 1.8 million RMB (about $290,000 USD at the time of writing) and the runner up receives 600,000 RMB. This puts the tournament in the same league as the Bailing Cup and Samsung Cup, in terms of prize money.

The official name, ‘MLily Meng Baihe Cup World Go Open Tournament’ (try saying that 10 times) uses the sponsor’s double barrel English and Chinese names.

The Chinese name, 梦百合 Meng (=dream) Baihe (=lilies), translates literally to ‘dream of lilies’. A looser, but more natural translation would be something like ‘sweet dreams’. This explains the somewhat cryptic ‘MLily’ moniker.

Game records

Zhou Ruiyang vs Park Junghwan

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Zhou-Ruiyang-vs-Park-Junghwan-20150830.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Tuo Jiaxi vs Ahn Seongjun

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Tuo-Jiaxi-vs-Ahn-Seongjun-20150830.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Tang Weixing vs Lee Sedol

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Tang-Weixing-vs-Lee-Sedol-20150901.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Park Younghun vs Zhou Ruiyang

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display4″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Park-Younghun-vs-Zhou-Ruiyang-20150901.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Xie Ke vs Ahn Seongjun

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display5″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Xie-Ke-vs-Ahn-Seongjun-20150901.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Ke Jie vs Rong Yi

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display6″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/09\/Ke-Jie-vs-Rong-Yi-20150901.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1Up0KZ0

Lee Sedol wins his 4th Asian TV Cup title – 27th Asian TV Cup

Lee Sedol 9p defeated Park Junghwan 9p in the final of the the 27th Asian TV Cup, on August 28, 2015.

The final was played in Seoul, Korea, and Lee won by resignation after 207 moves.

Lee Sedol played wonderfully against Park Junghwan in the final, and added a 4th Asian TV Cup to his international record.

Park Junghwan 9 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 27th Asian TV Cup final.

Park Junghwan 9 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 27th Asian TV Cup final.

Lee Sedol’s comeback

Lee Sedol won the 19th Asian TV Cup, defeating Chen Yaoye 9p in 2007, and he won again the following year, defeating Cho Hanseung 9p.

Lee Sedol 9 dan won his 4th Asian TV Cup.

Lee Sedol won his 4th Asian TV Cup title.

In 2008, both Lee Sedol and Cho Hanseung donated their prize money to the Sichuan earthquake relief fun.

In 2014, Lee defeated Kono Rin 9p in the final, and it was his 3rd Asian TV Cup title.

In 2009, just before the 21st Asian TV Cup, Lee decided to retire. The final against Kong Jie 9p was his last game before his retirement.

At an interview before the final, he said tearfully, “this will be the last game of my career in Korea.”

However, at this year’s event he recalled that time and said, “I was so depressed and I couldn’t concentrate because of the conflict with the Korean Baduk Association and my retirement. I lost the game too.”

“This is the same venue as in 2009, and now I have good memories of this place and I’m very happy about that.”

Lee decided to make a comeback after taking a 6 month break, and he soon recovered his strength and sense of play. This was very fortunate for Go fans, including myself, who enjoy watching Lee’s dynamic and insightful style of play.

Park Junghwan’s defeat

Meanwhile, this was Park Junghwan’s 2nd Asian TV Cup final.

Park Junghwan 9dan was the runner up.

Park Junghwan 9 dan was the runner up at the 27th Asian TV Cup.

He was in the final of 25th Asian TV Cup in 2013, but he lost to Iyama Yuta 9p and it was a painful defeat for him.

That’s because Park and Iyama were ranked #1, in Korea and Japan respectively, at the time.

Many of his fans in Korea were disappointed when he lost to Iyama.

This time, he defeated Liao Xingwen 5p and Lee Donghoon 5p to proceed to the final, but his run was stopped by Lee Sedol.

The head to head record between Lee Sedol and Park Junghwan is 13-6 in Lee’s favor, including this final.

It looks like Park still hasn’t overtaken Lee, even though Park’s been ranked #1 in Korea for nearly two years now.

At a post-game interview, Park said “I wanted to play a good game without worrying about the result, but I couldn’t do so. I’ll study hard and I hope to meet Lee in another final soon.”

The Chinese and Japanese contenders

Ichiriki Ryo 7 dan (left) and Yang Dingxin 3 dan at the 27th Asian TV Cup, 1st round.

Ichiriki Ryo 7 dan (left) and Yang Dingxin 3 dan at the 27th Asian TV Cup.

All the Japanese players in this event were eliminated at an early stage.

Iyama Yuta won the tournament in 2013, and Kono Rin came 2nd in 2014, but this year’s results weren’t satisfactory for the Japanese players.

Ida Atsushi 8p and Ichiriki Ryo 7p were also defeated, by Lee Donghun 5p and Yang Dingxin 3p respectively.

China’s representatives didn’t fare much better. Yang Dingxin won his 1st round game, but he lost to Lee Sedol in the semifinals.

Meanwhile, Liao Xingwen 5p was defeated by Park Junghwan in round 1.

Kong Jie 9p has won the Asian TV Cup three times in a row, from 2009 to 2011, but somehow Chinese players haven’t done well in this lightning tournament since then.

The Asian TV Cup

The Asian TV Cup is a lightning Go tournament open to the winners and runners up of domestic Chinese, Japanese and Korean lightning tournaments.

The name ‘Asian TV’ came about because the domestic lightning tournaments were all sponsored by local broadcasting stations – CCTV, NHK and KBS respectively.

However, in 2013, China spoiled the party by changing the sponsor of their qualifying tournament to CITIC Bank.

Beijing, Tokyo and Seoul take turns as tournament hosts.

The previous year’s winner is seeded into the semifinals while the other six players battle it out for the three remaining semifinal places.

The players receive 10 minutes main time and 30 seconds byo-yomi for their games.

Yang-Dingxin 3 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 27th Asian TV Cup, semifinals.

Yang-Dingxin 3 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 27th Asian TV Cup semifinals.

Game records

Lee Sedol vs Park Junghwan

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/08\/Lee-Sedol-vs-Park-Junghwan-20150828.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Lee Sedol vs Yang Dingxin

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display2″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/08\/Lee-Sedol-vs-Yang-Dingxin-20150827.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Lee Donghoon vs Park Junghwan

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display3″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/08\/Lee-Donghoon-vs-Park-Junghwan-20150826.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Yang Dingxin vs Ichiriki Ryo

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display4″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/08\/Yang-Dingxin-vs-Ichiriki-Ryo-20150826.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1Uh6JUS

Go Commentary: Lee Sedol vs Chen Yaoye – 2013 Samsung Cup

This game is from the 2013 Samsung Cup, round of 16.

The game was played between Lee Sedol 9p and Chen Yaoye 9p on October 8, 2013, in Daejeon, Korea.

Chen Yaoye 9 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2013 Samsung Cup, round of 16.

Chen Yaoye 9 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2013 Samsung Cup, round of 16.

Chen Yaoye

Lee Sedol and Chen Yaoye already played each other in the group stage of this Samsung Cup, and Chen won the game.

Chen Yaoye 9 dan at the 2013 Samsung Cup, round of 16.

Chen Yaoye 9 dan at the 2013 Samsung Cup, round of 16.

However, Lee defeated Komatsu Hideki 9p to pass through the group stage, and they faced in the round of 16 again.

They also played at the 9th Chunlan Cup final in June 2013, and Chen defeated Lee and winning the title with a 2-1 score.

That was Chen Yaoye’s first career international title, and it seemed as if Chen’s period had begun.

After Chen won the 9th Chunlan Cup, many Go fans regarded him as the strongest player in the world.

That’s because both Chen and Lee were ranked #1 in China and Korea, so their final was regarded as a grand final.

The title deciding game of the Chunlan Cup was a masterpiece of these two players.

Lee Sedol

Lee Sedol was in deep slump in the 1st half of 2013. He lost to Park Junghwan 9p in the 14th Maxim Cup final, and he was also defeated by Kim Jiseok 9p in the 18th GS Caltex Cup final.

Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2013 Samsung Cup, round of 16.

Lee Sedol 9 dan at the 2013 Samsung Cup, round of 16.

However, he was getting better from the slump in the 2nd half of 2013, and he was in good form again when he was playing this game.

Many of his fans still considered him as the best player, and he needed to show his power and strength in the international matches like this Samsung Cup.

Their head to head records before this game was tie with 5-5. However, Chen was winning their last three games in a row, and I assume that this would have been a tough game for Lee.

Chen was very strong against top Korean players by that time, with his solid and defensive style of play. He hardly made mistakes when he was in good shape, and he was getting stronger against Lee as well.

Anyway, let’s have a look at their dynamic game.

Commented game record

Lee Sedol vs Chen Yaoye

gliftWidget = glift.create({“divId”:”glift_display1″,”sgf”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/2015\/08\/Lee-Sedol-vs-Chen-Yaoye-20131008-Commentary-An-Younggil.sgf”,”display”:{“theme”:”DEPTH”,”goBoardBackground”:”https:\/\/gogameguru.com\/i\/glift\/purty_wood.jpg”,”drawBoardCoords”:”1″}});

 

Our Go game diagrams and Go problems require JavaScript to work.

Please enable it when viewing Go Game Guru.

Download SGF File (Go Game Record)

 

Related Articles

via Go Game Guru http://ift.tt/1fHKeoZ