Lee Sedol Retirement Plans Apparently On Hold

Lee Sedol 9P’s plans to retire from competitive play and move to the US may not be quite as firm as they seemed last year (In Shocker, Lee Sedol Announces Retirement; May Move to U.S. 2/13/2013).

“One year later, it seems that Lee’s plans are less definite than we originally thought,” Go Game Guru’s David Ormerod reported on May 29. In 2013, according to Ormerod, Lee (at right, with Gu Li) was involved in projects like Go9Dan.com and was missing his daughter, who was studying in Canada. He started to seriously talk about retiring again at that time.

“Unfortunately, Go9Dan didn’t work out as planned, which affected Lee’s other plans,” Ormerod reported. “On a more positive note, the long mooted jubango between Lee Sedol and Gu Li finally became a reality and our source believes this has rekindled Lee’s passion for go. Because of this, Lee has stopped talking about retiring and doesn’t appear to have any plans to do so in the near future.” Lee now leads 3-2 in the jubango.

“If there’s no imminent plan for retirement, then that’s mostly good news for go fans, because we’ll be able to enjoy more of Lee’s spectacular games in the meantime,” Ormerod concludes. “In the long run, Lee will surely do whatever he thinks is best for his family. And North American go players can keep their fingers crossed.”
– based on Ormerod’s longer report on the GGG site.

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Go Quiz Reminder: Name That Problem

The go problem on this year’s US Go Congress logo is from a collection of classic Chinese problems and like most such problems it has a name. Is it: The Warrior EscapesAn Ambush of Five Stones; or A Pearl Emerging from the SeaClick here to submit your answer. And, for a chance to win $50 off your Congress registration, email your solution to the problem to registrar@gocongress.org before midnight on Saturday, May 31. In any case, if you’re definitely planning on coming to the US Go Congress in New York City this August you’ll want to register by the May 31 deadline to save $50 off your registration fee.

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EuroGoTV Update: Russia, Romania, Poland

Russia: Ruslan Dmitriev 5d took the Championship of Moscow on May 18 while Vjacheslav Kajmin 4d placed second and Vadim Khavin 4d was third. Romania: The Romanian Championship Semifinal also finished on May 18 with (left) in first, George Chirila 1d in second, and Liviu Oprisan 4d in third. Poland: Stanislaw Frejlak 4d championed the Turniej w Ozarowie Mazowieckim on May 18. Behind him were Kamil Konieczny 5k in second and Dawid Libront 7k in third.
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

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Weekly Go problems: Week 117

Here are the weekly Go problems for week 117.

Black plays first in all problems and all solutions are labeled ‘correct’. Have fun!

Easy Go problem

This sort of situation comes up fairly often in the corner. Black can make two eyes with one move.

[Embedded SGF File]

ggg easy 117 picture

Download the solutions to the easy problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Intermediate Go problem

White seems to have a lot of eyespace, but her shape is short of liberties.

[Embedded SGF File]

ggg intermediate 117 picture

Download the solutions to the intermediate problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Hard Go problem

This problem looks almost the same as the previous one, but has different strengths and weaknesses. Be careful about relying too heavily on memorized sequences, as they can lead to blunders when the situation is a bit different.

[Embedded SGF File]

go problems 117 picture

Download the solutions to the hard problem as an SGF or PDF file.

 

Still want more Go problems?

You can find Go books packed full of life and death problems, tesuji problems and other valuable Go knowledge at the Go Game Shop.

Discuss other possible moves

If you have any questions or want to discuss any of these problems, please leave a comment below at any time. You can use the coordinates on the problem images to discuss a move or sequence of moves.

You can also download the solutions as a PDF or SGF file by clicking the links below each problem.

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Lee Sedol cools on retirement plans

In 2013 Go Game Guru reported on Lee Sedol 9p’s plans to retire (from competitive play) and move to the US.

At the time, we quoted Lee as saying, “I’ll definitely retire and move overseas within three years.”

Go players, especially in the US, were excited at the time. However, one year later, it seems that Lee’s plans are less definite than we originally thought.

Gu Li Lee Sedol 550x365 picture

Lee Sedol 9 dan (right) and Gu Li 9 dan are playing a jubango in 2014. This has helped to rekindle Lee Sedol’s interest in Go.

Rumors and expectations

It’s been clear to us, as well as the Korean Go community, that Lee’s plans to retire have been on the back burner for some time.

Since we were the ones who originally reported this news (outside of Asia) though, and many Go players still seem to be anticipating Lee’s retirement, I feel that we should clarify the situation as we now understand it.

That is, Lee Sedol was seriously thinking about retiring and moving to the US, but his plans are not so clear anymore.

There are also some rumors that I want to address below.

What our source said

We spoke to a source who is very close to Lee and is well known to us at Go Game Guru.

Our source would prefer not to get involved in the politics or rumors surrounding this story, so they asked that we please keep their identity confidential.

Beyond speaking to Lee himself (which we haven’t done because he’s way too busy to be bothered about this) our source is one of the most reliable and trustworthy people you could talk to on this topic. Younggil and I will both vouch for that.

They said that Lee was seriously considering retiring, but that he’s since changed his mind.

He first spoke of retiring in 2009, when he took his leave of absence. At the time, because of some issues with the Korean Baduk Association, Lee often talked about retiring and not coming back.

The issues were mostly resolved and Lee returned to the tournament scene in 2010.

In 2013, Lee was involved in projects like Go9Dan.com and was missing his daughter, who was studying in Canada. He started to seriously talk about retiring again at that time.

Unfortunately, Go9Dan didn’t work out as planned, which affected Lee’s other plans. On a more positive note, the long mooted jubango between Lee Sedol and Gu Li finally became a reality and our source believes this has rekindled Lee’s passion for Go.

Because of this, Lee has stopped talking about retiring and doesn’t appear to have any plans to do so in the near future.

The rumors are not true

There have been rumors circulating that the original article written by Um Minyong, which we referred to in our earlier article, was entirely fabricated.

Some people have contacted us with these rumors and asked us to issue a correction.

However, our source is clear in stating that those rumors are false and that the criticism of Um Minyong is unjustified.

At the time, Lee may have slightly overstated the certainty of his plans to retire and the newspaper published Mr Um’s article in a somewhat sensational manner, but it was not fabricated.

What Lee Sedol says

Lee Sedol hasn’t spoken publicly about his retirement plans for some time, and, as I said above, we didn’t talk to him about this article because he’s too busy.

About a month after the original news was published, Lee said in another interview that there was a 50/50 chance that his plans to retire and move to the US would come to fruition. He explained at the time that there were many things to organize before that could happen and that it was complicated.

Since then, he hasn’t (to the best of our knowledge) said anything else substantive about whether he’ll retire or not. He hasn’t ruled retiring in or out. He’s simply stopped talking about it as the jubango with Gu Li and other things have demanded his attention.

People are allowed to change their minds

It sometimes seems to me that we no longer give people the latitude to say something and later change their minds these days.

There seems to be a view, especially with respect to politicians and other public figures, that saying one thing earlier and then saying something else later automatically means the original statement was a lie.

Sometimes people do lie, or make mistakes, but sometimes the situation changes. When things change, changing your opinion can be the intelligent and sensible thing to do. In Go, you need to change your strategy as cicumstances shift, and life is exactly the same.

If there’s no imminent plan for retirement, then that’s mostly good news for Go fans, because we’ll be able to enjoy more of Lee’s spectacular games in the meantime. In the long run, Lee will surely do whatever he thinks is best for his family. And North American Go players can keep their fingers crossed.

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Apology for recent delays at Go Game Guru

I’m sorry about recent delays and the lack of updates on our website. People have been emailing us to ask if everything is ok, and offering all sorts of advice.

Nothing is wrong, it’s simply a result of some bad luck. I was sick earlier in the year and then I injured my leg quite badly.

For a while, I couldn’t work at my desk and had to work on a laptop with my leg elevated, so it was harder to keep up than usual.

Unfortunately, Go Game Guru is still a fairly small operation and things don’t run as well as usual when one of us is out of action. Hopefully we’ll overcome this one day in the future.

Everything is now back to normal and is being addressed as follows:

1. We’ll catch up with Baduk TV English posts and back date them, so there will be just as many new subtitled videos published as if nothing had happened. Four new videos have been published already this week.

2. We’ll get back to our regular posting schedule from now on.

3. No orders for Go equipment or books were affected because of this and our Go shop will keep functioning normally, as it has been.

Thanks to everyone who emailed us expressing concern. We’ll concentrate now on posting things and getting everything back up to date.

David

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criteria of common amateur mistakes and understainding pros’ games

I teach Go in a very unique way. For example, I send various problems after each lesson; as far as I know I’m the only Go teacher who sends problems after a lesson. I make and send problems because of the following reasons: http://ift.tt/1riqHjv

Using the following criteria is one of other unique teaching methods (As far as I know, I’m the only Go teacher who has made the criteria. Before I made these, I had to teach hundreds, perhaps a thousand adult players, to analyze their mistakes, and to understand the level of their mistakes. So it took me many years to make the following criteria:

☆I often comment like “$30 common mistake.” See below:

$100 mistake = With this mistake, you can lose a game instantly. So you must avoid it.
$ 90 mistake = Excruciatingly bad,
$ 80 mistake = Excessively bad. It’s so bad that you may not forget it for a week.
$ 70 mistake = It’s so bad that you may not forget it for the next day,
$ 60 mistake = It’s so bad that you may not forget it for the next an hour,
$ 50 mistake = Very bad,
$ 40 mistake = Bad,
$ 30 mistake = No good,
$ 20 mistake = Not so good,
$ 10 mistake = It’s a light mistake and not so important for kyu players.
$ 5 mistake =A small mistake; 1 and 2 dan players don’t have to worry about it.

BTW, the other day one of the students asked me why a top pro
did play a certain move. I couldn’t answer that.

Here is what I wrote in the email:

With regard to top pros’ moves, I’m sorry, I’m afraid, but I couldn’t answer that.

Top pros’ moves are beyond my understanding. Even if I spend many
hours, days, or months, I could only guess what each move means.
They could read a hundred moves in a flash according to some pros.

If I understood the meaning of each move, I would be getting pros’ titles today.

BTW, I believe that in order to become strong as fast as possible,
I recommend studying the following way: http://ift.tt/1q5h6Mq

Of course, playing top pros’ games is a lot of fun, and their moves, tesuji,
and shapes are beautiful. It’s really great to spend some time and appreciate
their games.

If you review pros’ games, I strongly recommend that you buy a book with showing a
commentary. Consequently, you will understand some of the moves and appreciate their games.

So if you like to review pros’ games, you should by all means do that.

Thank you very much for reading this blog again out of your busy life.

Kaz

via Go, Igo, Weiqi, Baduk. Kaz’s original Igo-advice & fundamentals of Igo http://ift.tt/1riqHjF

May 29, 2014 at 09:56AM

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Registration Opens for 2014 World Youth Mind-Sports Fair

Young go players are invited to participate in the 2014 World Youth Mind-Sports Fair, scheduled for July 25-28 at Gangneng Yeong-dong College in Gangwon-do, Gangneng-si, Rep. of Korea. Participants must be born after 1991; there’s an entry fee of $50 USD and the $150 accommodation fee includes meals. Sponsors include the Korea Amateur Baduk Association. Register online; payments must be made by June 30. For more info/details, email kchesskorea@daum.net, call 82-2-3448-6611 or fax 82-2-6280-9329.

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The Traveling Go Board: Benjamin Wong’s Hong Kong Go Adventure

On his BenGoZen blog, Benjamin Wong recently posted a nice report on his Hong Kong go adventure earlier this year. After spotting an ad for go on a bus, Wong was disappointed to discover that the Hong Kong Go Asso­ci­a­tion (HKGA) does not have a go salon where visitors can drop in for a game. “I was pretty bummed to hear that,” Hong, a 2-kyu who lives in the metro Washington area, writes. “After all, would my epic go adven­ture in Hong Kong be reduced to sim­ply vis­it­ing the HKGA and maybe tak­ing a few pic­tures? All hope was nearly gone until the sec­re­tary told my mom that I could take pri­vate lessons if I wanted to.” This launches an adventure across the city that will be familiar to anyone who’s tried to track down go in a foreign country. In addition to being entertaining, Hong’s tale has a happy ending and reveals the correct address of the HKGA, including a helpful photo of the sign to look for. Hint, not the one at right.

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