Ing Foundation to hold Chang Qi semifinals at Harvard in September ’15

The Shanghai Ing Chang-ki Wei-ch’i (Go) Educational Foundation, will be holding the semifinals of 12th Annual Chinese Professional Chang Qi Cup Invitational Tournament in Cambridge, MA, next fall, along with two new side tournaments intended for the North American go community, the EJ has learned.

The Chang Qi Cup, jointly hosted by the Ing Foundation and the China Go Association, now one of the most prestigious of the domestic Chinese go tournaments, was started in 2004 in memory of Taiwanese businessman and go benefactor Ing Chang-ki. Past winners have included greats such as Gu Li 9p, Kong Jie 9p and Chen Yaoye 9p. According to AGA President Andy Okun and Michael Fodera of the American Collegiate Go Association (ACGA), the Ing Foundation and Mr. Ing’s son, Ying Ming-haw, have decided to take advantage of the 2015 semis to provide a promotional event for American players and to strengthen ties between the North American and Chinese go communities.

The semifinal matches will take place Sept. 26-28 at Harvard University Student Center. Alongside the main event, on Sept. 26-27 the Foundation will be sponsoring a tournament for college students to be run by ACGA and a tournament for amateurs to be run by the AGA, both with major prizes, Okun and Fodera said. There will also be simultaneous games with visiting professionals, commentary on the semis, and side trips to meet go players in Washington DC and New York on Sept. 29 and 30. “This event will have something for everyone, tournaments for those who crave the competition but also teaching events, an opportunity to watch the best players in action and a chance to get together with old friends and make new ones,” Okun said. Watch the EJ for further details as they’re available.

via American Go E-Journal http://www.usgo.org/news/2014/11/2015-chang-qi-cup-invitational-semifinals-to-be-held-in-boston/

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EuroGoTV Update: Sweden, Romania, Finland

Jaakko Virtanen 2dSweden: The Gothenburg Open finished on November 23 with Charlie Aakerblom 4d in first, John Karlsson 4d in second, and Erik Ouchterlony 4d in third. Romania: Also on November 23, Ionel Santa 2d took the Romanian Cup Semifinal in Bucuresti. Pierre Boulestreau 1d came in second and George Chirila 1d was third. Finland: Jaakko Virtanen 2d (left) bested Jesse Savo 4d at the Turku Championship on November 23 while Tuukka Muroke 2d placed third.
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

via American Go E-Journal http://www.usgo.org/news/2014/11/eurogotv-update-sweden-romania-finland/

Weekly Go problems: Week 128

Here are the weekly Go problems for week 128.

Black plays first in all problems and all solutions are labeled ‘correct’. Have fun!

Easy Go problem

This week’s problems are all about shortage of liberties.

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Intermediate Go problem

We looked at this tesuji once before. Capturing White requires a delicate move order.

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Hard Go problem

Sometimes I feel guilty because I don’t care whether my stones live or die, only that I’ve made them all work hard beforehand!

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Still want more Go problems?

You can find Go books packed full of life and death problems, tesuji problems and other valuable Go knowledge at the Go Game Shop.

Discuss other possible moves

If you have any questions or want to discuss any of these problems, please leave a comment below at any time. You can use the coordinates on the problem images to discuss a move or sequence of moves.

You can also download the solutions as a PDF or SGF file by clicking the links below each problem.

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Go Commentary: Park Junghwan vs Tang Weixing – 2014 Samsung Cup

This is the last game of the 2014 Samsung Cup semifinals.

This game was played between Park Junghwan 9p and Tang Weixing 9p, on November 7, 2014. The match was played at the Samsung training center in Daejeon, Korea.

Tang Weixing won the first game of this match, but Park tied the score in the second game, so this game would decide the finalist of 2014 Samsung Cup.

Park Junghwan

Park Junghwan 2014 Samsung Cup 300x448 picture

Park Junghwan 9 dan is currently ranked #1 in Korea.

Park Junghwan 9p is currently ranked #1 in Korea. Nobody else has taken the #1 position from Park over the last year.

His results in domestic matches are excellent, but he hasn’t been doing very well in international tournaments over the last couple of years.

He won the 24th Fujitsu Cup, defeating Qiu Jun 9p in 2011, but since then he hasn’t gained any other international titles.

Many Korean fans want to see him win another international title soon, because he’s the absolute #1 in Korea at the moment.

Tang Weixing

Tang Weixing 2014 Samsung Cup t 300x300 picture

Tang Weixing 9 dan has become even stronger since winning the 2013 Samsung Cup.

On the other hand, Tang Weixing 9p is #9 in China and he’s the defending champion in this tournament.

He won the 2013 Samsung Cup last year, defeating Lee Sedol 9p with a 2-0 score. It was a sensational result at the time.

His career wasn’t that remarkable up until then, but since becoming a world champion, he’s become even stronger and his game is more stable.

Tang is very strong in second half of the game, especially when he’s losing. He plays even better when he’s behind.

His style of play is provocative and it’s very hard to deal with players like him when you’re winning and are trying to simplify the game.

The head to head record between these players stood at 3-1 in Park’s favor before this game.

Park defeated Tang in the 10th Chunlan Cup and the 19th LG Cup in 2014, and they’d shared one win each in this semifinal match.

Let’s have a look at the deciding game of this 2014 Samsung Cup semifinal match.

Commented game record

Park Junghwan vs Tang Weixing

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Nihon Kiin Donates $2M to Iwamoto North America Foundation for Go

Nihon Kiin Chairman Wada Norio on November 25 announced a donation of $2M to serve as the seed fund for the new Iwamoto North America 2014.11.26_Iwamoto-OCT_1970Foundation for Go (INAF).

INAF was founded earlier this year (Iwamoto North America Foundation for Go Takes Next Step 8/11/2014 EJ) to support the promotion of go in North America according to the vision and wishes of the late Japanese go master, Iwamoto Kaoru (at right in October, 1970).

2014.11.26_INAF-Logo2“We’re very glad to see that, after nearly two years of effort, the Iwamoto North American Foundation is now ready to move into action,” said Thomas Hsiang, who is serving as Executive Director of INAF. “We thank the Nihon Kiin Board, which gave unanimous consent to the donation. In the coming years, the INAF Board looks forward to restarting an East Coast Go Center and to funding new go promotional and exchange projects.” INAF will seek proposals for these activities; updates will be posted on the official INAF website. Other INAF officials include Norio Wada, President, Andy Okun, Masaki Shusuke, David Weimer and Yamashiro Hiroshi, Directors.

 

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Go Spotting: Go TED Talk

In his 2013 “A New Equation For Intelligence” TED Talk, Alex Wissner-Gross uses go to demonstrate his thesis that there is a single equation 2014.11.25_TED-talkfor intelligence. Drawing on the fact that computer game playing has improved to the point that in 1997 the computer beat the world chess champion and in the last decade computers have made significant progress in playing go, Wissner-Gross postulates that intelligence is a “physical force that resists future confinement.”
– Ted Terpstra, with thanks to Arnold Eudell and Joshua Guarino. We also covered this in a February 8, 2014 post.

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“Kuma Sensei” Visits Seattle

Kuma by Thane WilliamsOn November 15th and 16th, the Seattle Go Center welcomed Yu Hou 6 P from the Nihon Ki-in for a workshop event. “Kuma Sensei” provided instruction on a variety of basic go techniques to a group of eager students. As the participants learned about go, Kuma Sensei had the opportunity to practice English, giving everyone a chance to study. For both days, the workshop followed the same routine, with the morning schedule starting at 9:00am. Kuma Sensei began by holding a lecture, followed by review of participant games, and then with everyone going to eat lunch. In the afternoon, after playing simultaneous teaching match with the participants, Kuma Sensei reviewed the games.

Saturday’s lecture on about the Double Approach was truly great, captivating the attention of all of the students. Even though the lecture covered basic techniques, not only beginners, but also dan players thought it was a very interesting lecture. Thanks to Kuma Sensei’s way of speaking and sense of humor, everyone was delighted. Personally, I especially enjoyed the time after the event on Saturday – while eating dinner with Kuma Sensei, we could discuss a variety of cross-cultural topics outside of go. It was truly enjoyable. The workshop, being only two days, really seemed to end too quickly.

Through this workshop, covering a variety of topics ranging from Go Lectures to matches with Kuma Sensei, we “enjoyably” learned a lot. Through this rare opportunity of having a pro come from Japan, participants deepened their interest in go, and could boost their go abilities. The Kuma Sensei Workshop went quite well, so Seattle Go fans hope for events of the same kind to happen in the future.  Report by Brian Kirby/photo by Thane Williams

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Students Swell Syracuse Turnout

A record 35 players participated in the Syracuse Go Club’s Fall Self-Paired Tournament on November 22, “the high count due in no small part to the twelve primary and secondary students who came to play,” reports organizer and TD Richard Moseson. Eight players drove in from outside of Syracuse, including three from the Utica club, three from Cornell University’s club, and two from Rochester.  A wide assortment of free refreshments, some homemade, were available throughout the day, and every player was able to choose a prize to take home at the end of the day. Prizes included new books provided at a discount by Slate and Shell and boxed anime donated by the American Go Foundation. photo (far left): 8th grader Rachel Liu 19k, playing in her first tournament. photos by Richard Moseson

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Chimin Oh Wins 15th “Go to Innovation”

Chimin Oh 7D, a former go instructor from Korea who now lives in England, won the €1000 first place prize in the November 14-16 “Go to SONY DSCInnovation” tournament which drew fifty-five players from around the world to Berlin, Germany.  Viktor Lin (5-dan, Austria) came in second and won €500 and Zebin Du (6-dan, China) won €250 for third place. Rita Pocsai (4-dan, Hungary) won  €500 from Omikron Data Quality GmbH, for best performance by a female player. She also won the €100 prize for her 10th place finish. No one won the jackpot prize for winning eight games. In fact no one managed to win seven games. Click here for complete results and a photo gallery.

There were eight rounds and the Hahn Pointing system, developed by Professor Sang-Dae Hahn of Myongji University, was used to determine tournament winners. Instead of assigning 1 or 0  for a win or loss , the Hahn system awards points from 0 to 100 based on the difference in game counts. Close games with a  difference between .5 to 10 points in game counts results in the winner receiving 60 points and the loser 40 points, but a decisive win with a difference of 40 points or more  results in the winner receiving all 100 points and the loser receiving nothing. This encourages fighting, aggressive games.

– Larry Eclipse, based on a report by James Davies on the IGF News Feed; photos by Jaromir Sir

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