Gu Li Evens the Score in Jubango with Lee Sedol

Gu Li 9P won game 4 of the MLily Gu vs Lee Jubango on April 27, drawing even with Lee Sedol 9P at two all for the match so far. Game 4 was held on Jeungdo (Jeung Island) in Shinan County, near Lee Sedol’s hometown, and was the first and only game scheduled in Korea. Before the game, the players paid their respects to the hundreds who died when a ferry tragically capsized on April 16. The ferry incident occurred near the venue for this match. Go fans who like to follow the Lee Sedol – Gu Li rivalry will already know that this is Gu’s fourth consecutive victory against Lee in the last two months. Game 5 will be held in Yunnan Province, China, and is shaping up to be a crucial turning point in the match. Click here to download the game record or click on the link below to see An Younggil 8P’s  preliminary comments on the game.
– David Ormerod, Go Game Guru 

 

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Neck and neck: Gu Li vs Lee Sedol jubango – Game 4

Gu Li Lee Sedol MLily Gu Lee Jubango Game 4 t picture

Gu Li 9 dan (left) and Lee Sedol 9 dan at game 4 of their jubango.

Gu Li 9p won game 4 of the MLily Gu vs Lee Jubango, drawing even with Lee Sedol 9p at two all for the match so far.

Game 4 was held on Jeungdo (Jeung Island) in Shinan County, near Lee Sedol’s hometown, and was the first and only game scheduled in Korea.

Before the game, the players paid their respects to the hundreds who died when a ferry tragically capsized on April 16.

The ferry incident occurred near the venue for this match.

Gu Li extends his streak to 4 in a row

Go fans who like to follow the Lee Sedol – Gu Li rivalry will already know that this is Gu’s fourth consecutive victory against Lee in the last two months.

Gu Li Lee Sedol MLily Gu Lee Jubango Game 4 550x351 picture

Do you see the light?” Gu Li (left) seems to have all the answers lately, chalking up four consecutive wins against Lee Sedol.

Lee will be wanting to dismiss these consecutive losses from his mind and focus all his energy on winning the next game, to stop Gu from making off like a runaway train.

However, anyone who’s played Go competively will know that this is easier said than done.

Lee Sedol MLily Gu Lee Jubango Game 4 picture

After losing his early advantage, Lee Sedol will be keen to put an end to Gu’s winning streak in the next game.

Game 5 will be held in Yunnan Province, China, and is shaping up to be a crucial turning point in the match.

An Younggil’s preliminary comments

Go Game Guru’s An Younggil 8p is in Korea at the moment, and reviewed the game live with other pros. Here are their preliminary comments, which Younggil kindly sent through for GGG readers:

(Note: you can download the game record or scroll down to view the game online and follow along with these comments)

Gu Li started the game with the Micro Chinese Opening.

Lee Sedol Gu Li MLily Gu Lee Jubango Game 4 1 550x367 picture

Gu Li (right) plays his first move against Lee Sedol.

White’s approach from the side, at 8, has been getting more popular recently.

White 10 was unusual. Approaching at 14 is more common in this position, but Lee chose this move instead.

It looks like both players had researched this pattern before the game. The result up to 27 is playable for both.

Black 37 and 39 were good tesuji, and the game was still even up to Black 49.

Black 57 and 59 formed a nice combination, but White 58 and 60 were good responses.

White 66 was very sharp, and the result up to here was favorable for White.

White 72 and 74 were practical moves, and Lee might have thought that the game was good for White at this point.

White 76 was somewhat questionable, and the game became more or less even again here. White should have played at 87 instead.

White 82 was also a mistake. White should still have played at 87. Lee must felt that the game was still alright for him, but Black 83 was sharp, and Black 85 and 87 were very big. Those moves helped Black’s top group and also aimed to cut at M17.

White 88 doesn’t look good either. Black was happy to reinforce the corner territory with Black 89.

Black 113 was a brilliant move, and the game became slightly favorable for Black. The game was still very close, but Black was slightly better after Black 121.

Black 167 was the finishing blow, and the game was practically over here. If white connects at 173, Black will cut at 172, and he’ll be able to gain some more endgame points by squeezing.

Up to Black 179, Black was winning the game by around 2.5 points, so Lee Sedol resigned.

Lee Sedol Gu Li MLily Gu Lee Jubango Game 4 550x368 picture

Gu Li (right) defeated Lee Sedol by resignation in 179 moves.

The MLily Gu vs Lee Jubango

Two of the world’s top Go players, Lee Sedol and Gu Li, will play a jubango throughout 2014, to decide which of them is the stronger player.

A jubango is a 10 game match between two players. The term originates from the Japanese language and has been imported into English language Go parlance. The first player to win six games wins the match.

The official name for this event is the MLily Gu vs Lee Jubango. MLily is a mattress and bedding company that also sponsors the MLily Cup.

Go Game Guru is writing a book about this match and posting news and commentary about each game as it happens.

Game record

Gu Li vs Lee Sedol – Game 4

[Embedded SGF File]

David Ormerod, with Younggil An and Jingning Xue

 

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Andy Liu 1P & Kevin Huang 7D Lead Washington Open Baduk Championship

Andy Liu 1P leads the first Washington Open Baduk Championship, 3-0 going into the final two rounds in Vienna, VA this weekend. Kevin Huang 7D is also 3-0 so the two are sure to meet on Sunday. Top-board games will be broadcast on KGS starting at 9:30a EST. Other top 2-game winners were Elaine Jiang 6D, Li Siyuan 7D, Zhaonian Chen 7D, Wu Changlong 7D, Stephanie Yi and Kang Shin 7D. Click here for standings: Andy Liu 8d-Park In 2D and Liu Jian 2D-Stephen Webb 25k. See below for game records for Board 1 Rounds 1-3. 88 players turned out for the first day of play at the newest major AGA event, co-hosted by the Korean Amateur Baduk Association (KABA) and the American Go Association (AGA), and organized by the NOVA Go Club, the Baltimore Go Club, and the Korean-American Go Association.
2014.04.26_WOBC-Rd1-B1-Siyuan-Yin
2014.04.26_WOBC-Rd2-B1-Changlong-Liu
2014.04.26_WOBC-Rd3-B1-Liu-Chen

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Ambassador Suh Dae-won Receives First Washington Open Baduk Award

The first award of the Washington Open Baduk Championship was announced after just one round on the first day of play. Tournament Director Allan Abramson presented retired Ambassador Suh Dae-won of Korea with an award recognizing his work promoting the game of go. Ambassador Suh played a key role bringing the annual Cotsen Open to the Korean Cultural Center in Los Angeles in recent years (dates were recently confirmed for 2014-2016), facilitated the organizing of the first Washington Open Baduk Championship this weekend in Northern Virginia – where nearly 100 players turned out Saturday — and is now in discussions about an event in Europe. “Bringing together the various go communities in our country has long been a dream of ours and efforts like this show just how far we have come,” said American Go Association president Andy Okun. “I’m very honored to receive this award,” said Ambassador Suh. “The Korean Amateur Baduk Association is committed to developing baduk in the United States. As the world’s largest economy and because of its huge influence worldwide this is a very important place to grow this global game. Thanks to all the organizers of this event for your dedication and hard work to make this event a success.” Also on hand was the Korean Minister for Economic Affairs, who declared himself “Very happy to see so many people playing the game in this country,” adding that “our embassy hopes to see this event continue next year and on into the future.”
– report/photo by Chris Garlock

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Lee Sedol vs Gu Li Jubango – Game 4 – Match times and details

Just in case you’ve forgotten, a quick reminder that game 4 of the MLily Gu vs Lee Jubango takes place tomorrow.

A pivotal game

Lee Sedol Gu Li MLily Gu Lee Jubango Game 3 t 300x300 picture

Lee Sedol 9 dan (left) and Gu Li 9 dan will play game 4 of their 10 game match on Sunday, April 27, 2014.

Lee Sedol 9p currently leads the 10 game match 2-1, but Gu Li 9p is on a three game winning streak against Lee (including games from other events).

Both players will be fighting hard in what promises to be an exciting and pivotal game in the series.

Match time

Tomorrow’s game starts at 9:00 am Korea time, Sunday, April 27.

That means it starts one hour earlier than previous games did, because they were played in China.

For those of you living in other time zones, that’s:

  • 12:00 am, Sunday morning, UTC
  • 8:00 pm, Saturday evening, US Eastern Daylight Time
  • 5:00 pm, Saturday evening, US Pacific Daylight Time
  • 1:00 am, Sunday morning, British Summer Time
  • 2:00 am, Sunday morning, Central European Summer Time, and
  • 10:00 am, Sunday morning, Australian Eastern Standard Time.

An Younggil is in Korea

Coincidentally, An Younggil 8p is currently in Korea for a family event and will be able to attend the game live at the venue.

The good news is that this means he’ll be able to analyze the game in detail with other pros at the venue, and will report back on their thoughts as well as his own.

The bad news is that he can’t simultaneously translate the Baduk TV coverage at Go Game Guru, so there will be no live translation beyond that provided by other viewers this month.

We’re sorry about this and things will return to normal in May.

Baduk TV starts when the game does

Another point worth noting for Baduk TV subscribers is that the Baduk TV Live coverage will start at the same time as the actual game this month, and will finish at 7:00 pm Korea time.

That’s 10 hours of live coverage, which will likely be too much for all but the most hardcore Go fans.

I recommend that you tune in throughout the day at a time that’s minimally disruptive to your normal sleep pattern (we all have jobs).

The commentators will likely go back and review the overall game at various times, while the players are thinking deeply about their moves.

Enjoy the game!

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EuroGoTV Update: Ukraine, Norway, Romania

Ukraine: The Second League Ukrainian Championship finished on April 13 in Kiev with Andrii Kravets 6d in first, Volodymyr Kokozei 5d in second, and Bohdan Zhurakovskyi 5d in third. Norway: Yaqi Fu 6d took the 2014 Nordic Championship in Bergen on April 20. Behind him were Paal Sannes 3d in second and Severin Hanevik 1d in third. Romania: Silvestru State 2d (left) led the Roman Youth Championship U 16 Final on April 13. Elian Ioan Grigoriu 1d placed second and Mircea Nitu 12k came in third.
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

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Upcoming European Tournaments: Open IGC 2014, Scottish Open

The Ishi Go Club will host the Open IGC 2014 on May 17 and 18 at the Polytechnic School of Lausanne in Switzerland. Amateur and experienced players are welcome to play. Registration is 30 CHF for adults and 15 CHF for youth (under 18) and students. In addition to the tournament, Hwang In-Seong will provide lessons and lectures. For more information, please visit the official Open ICG 2014 website.

The Scottish Open Go Tournament will be May 24 and 25 at the University of Glasgow. Registration for non-BGA members is 9 GBP while BGA-members will receive a 3 GBP discount. In addition to the tournament, there will be an informal lightning event on Friday, May 23 for players already in town. Accommodations are available through local players or seeglasgow.com. For more information, please visit the official Scottish Open tournament page.
—Annalia Linnan; for complete listings, check out the European Tournament Calendar

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Your Move/Readers Write: More on Disco A-Go-Go

“I got dressed to disco music this morning (Go Spotting: Disco A-Go-Go! 4/23/2014 EJ),” writes Phil Straus. “Thank you.”

In that same story, we said that “Perhaps a Japanese-speaking reader can translate the spoken section halfway through.” Reader Pieter Mioch came through for us:
Through the go board the stones make (bring about) ever changing variations
Go is like a scaled down version of life

goban wo bankai ni ishi ga kamoshidasu senpenbanka
go to wa jinsei no shukuzu no yo na mono desu.
碁盤を媒介に石が醸し出す千変万化
碁とは人生の縮図の様な物です。

And Tony Collman, our diligent UK correspondent who wrote the original story, did a little more digging and discovered that “Chris Linn is the stage name for Christer Lindstedt 2d who plays (played?) at Gothenburg. His last tournament play was at the 1998 Grand Prix d’Europe, where he placed 49th. He formed the Gothenburg Association of Songwriters in 2002.”

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Washington Open Baduk Championship Expecting Strong Field This Weekend

Attendance is expected to be near 100 at this weekend’s Washington Open Baduk Championship in Northern Virginia, reports organizer Allan Abramson.  Top players so far include Mingming Yin 9d (right), Zhaonian Chen 8d, Charles Choi 7d, James Park 7d, Changlong Wu 7d, Liang Yu 7d, Yuan Zhou 7d, Xinying Elaine Jiang 6d, Josh Lee 6d and Zhiyuan Edward Zhang 6d, “with plenty of players of all strengths ensuring a good field for everyone,” Abramson promises. He’s also planning to ask strong players to volunteer for simuls, “so everyone who wants a simul will get one on Sunday.” Top boards will be broadcast live on KGS; anyone interested in helping record/broadcast can email journal@usgo.org.

Players are competing for a top prize of at least $1,200 and cash prizes for every section. Myungwan Kim 9P and Sohyun Park 3P will give lectures for both dan and kyu players on Saturday night, followed by a rapid tournament, and the professionals will do game reviews and simuls on Sunday afternoon. The tournament will be held at the Korea-U.S. Science Cooperation Center (1952 Gallows Road, Suite 330) in Vienna, VA and is sponsored by the Embassy of the Republic of Korea, the Korean Cultural Center – DC, and Scorpion Sport Inc. in L.A. It is co-hosted by the Korean Amateur Baduk Association (KABA) and the American Go Association (AGA), and organized by the NOVA Go Club, the Baltimore Go Club, and the Korean-American Go Association. There’s no entry fee but AGA membership is required and lunch is free.

Click here to register. Organizers have negotiated a discounted rate with Extended Stay America (8281 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive, Fairfax VA 22031), 4.5 miles from the playing site; call 703-204-0088 and ask for the NOVA Go Club rate, or email MRD@extendedstay.com.
photo by Chris Garlock 

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